Recovering from a C-Section

To protect and accommodate your c section incision scar, the c-section corset has “bra-style” hook closures in the front.  It allows the user to put on the corset slowly and more comfortably since your incision area is tender and sensitive.

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How long do you wear a postpartum girdle

For how long should You wear a girdle or corset?

To achieve the best results, postpartum mothers should wear the appropriate medical-quality girdle continuously (24 hrs) for a minimum period of one week. After the initial week you may take it off during the night.You may continue to wear your garment for the remaining 120 days, or as long as you feel comfortable. You will be able to fit into the next size down which you may continue to wear until your skin has gone back to normal.

Postpartum Girdle after C-Section

Rachel describes her experience after using a Postpartum Girdle for C-Section Recovery.

Why do Postpartum Girdles work?

The growing fetus can stretch the rectus abdominis muscle as much as 50%. Still present after childbirth are hormones secreted during pregnancy such as estrogen, progesterone, and relaxin, which loosen the abdominal muscles, the pelvic structure, and supporting ligaments and joints. A Postpartum Girdle can offer greater stability to a woman’s body after delivery.


The girdle acts to retract the body by drawing in stretched muscles and providing 360° structure to the torso, subsequently reducing strain on ligaments and joints in the lower back, pelvis, and buttocks. Reducing stress in these areas enhances the body’s ability to return to its pre-pregnancy alignment and shape. Additionally, as shifted and constrained organs return to their pre-pregnancy locations, the wearer of a postpartum girdle will feel held in place and more confident in her body movements.

Diastasis Recti

Video testimonial of Faith describing her Diastasis-Recti and recovery.

Pronunciation:

dye-uh-STAY-siss REK-tye

Also Known As:

diastasis, abdominal separation

Definition:

Diastasis recti is a condition where the right and left sides of the rectus abdominus (the muscle that makes up the front wall of the abdominals, also known as the “six-pack” muscle) spread apart at the body’s midline. Diastasis negatively affects the strength of the abdominal wall and can aggravate lower back pain.

Bellefit helps with diastasis

What causes Diastasis?

Abdominal separation occurs most often in response to the force of the uterus pushing against the abdominal wall during pregnancy, but can also happen when there is an extreme over-abundance of sub-muscular (visceral) abdominal fat. In pregnancy, hormones are also partially to blame, as they can soften connective tissue, allowing the separation to occur more easily.

Risks of developing diastasis are greater in women who:

  • are expecting more than one baby
  • have had abdominal separation with a previous pregnancy
  • are very petite
  • have a pronounced sway back or poor abdominal muscle tone

Genetics are also a factor in predisposing some women to this condition.

How do I recognize Diastasis?

While some mothers discover they have it during pregnancy, others don’t find out until after birth. It happens to mothers whether they deliver their babies naturally or with a cesarean section. You will develop a gap or space below your navel and will notice a small mound protruding at your midline.

What are the complications?

Without treatment, muscular separation can cause some common health problems including: chronic pain in the waistline, back pain and an alteration of your posture due to a lack of abdominal strength and support.

Treatment:

There are simple ways to treat a muscular separation after giving birth to your baby. Basic abdominal exercises prove to be very helpful along with the use of a Post Partum Girdle or Corset which reduces recovery time diminishes complications caused by muscle separation and adds the esthetic benefit of helping you return to your pre-pregnancy figure. Even without diastasis, post natal women need adequate core strength and stability for proper lifting and carrying. Your BelleFit Girdle or Corset will give you the support you need.

Will I Recover from Diastasis Recti?:

Unfortunately, flurries of misconception swirl around the issue of abdominal reconditioning-and particularly abdominal separation/diastasis recti-after pregnancy. You’re likely to encounter a broad range of contradictory opinions and advice about how to recondition your abdominal wall and how to restore the midline after childbirth. Some of these assertions can cause unnecessary alarm, while another common piece of advice-do a lot of “crunches”-can actually worsen abdominal separation/diastasis recti.

Diastasis Recti Test

This simple self-test will help you determine if you have abdominal separation/diastasis recti and how severe it is.

1. Lie on your back with your knees bent, and the soles of your feet on the floor.
2. Place one hand behind your head and the other hand on your abdomen, with your fingertips across your midline –parallel with your waistline – at the level of your belly button.
3. With your abdominal wall relaxed, gently press your fingertips into your abdomen.
4. Roll your upper body off the floor into a “crunch”, making sure that your ribcage moves closer to your pelvis.
5. Move your fingertips back and forth across your midline, feeling for the right and left sides of your Rectus Abdominis muscle.

Special Precautions for Women with Diastasis Recti/Abdominal Separation

Avoid all activities that place stress on the midline, that stretch or overly expand the abdominal wall through everyday activities, exercise or inhalation techniques.

Some Types of Movement to Avoid

  • Movements where the upper body twists and the arm on that side reaches backward, such as during a tennis serve.
  • Exercises that require lying backward over a large exercise ball.
  • Yoga postures that stretch the abs, such as “cow pose”, “up dog”, all backbends and “belly breathing”
  • Most traditional abdominal exercises that work the exterior abdominal muscles, such as crunches and oblique curls.
  • All exercises that cause your abdominal wall to bulge out upon exertion.
  • Rising from a supine position by rolling up and twisting at the same time. Instead, roll first onto your side, and then use your arms to help push yourself up to a sitting position.
  • Lifting and carrying very heavy objects.
  • Intense coughing while your muscles are unsupported

Diastasis Recti and Coughing or Sneezing

If after childbirth you develop a cough from allergies or a respiratory illness, such as a cold or flu, instead of placing your hands across your belly and manually splint your abdomen together during coughing episodes, you may use your BelleFit Girdle or Corset. This will provide needed additional support, and prevent further separation of your midline.

Estrogen, Progesterone & Relaxin

The growing fetus can stretch the rectus abdominis muscle as much as 50%. Still present after childbirth are hormones secreted during pregnancy such as estrogen, progesterone, and relaxin, which loosen the abdominal muscles, the pelvic structure, and supporting ligaments and joints. A Bellefit® support garment can offer greater stability to a woman’s body after delivery. The garment acts to retract the body by drawing in stretched muscles and providing 360° structure to the torso, subsequently reducing strain on ligaments and joints in the lower back, pelvis, and buttocks. Reducing stress in these areas enhances the body’s ability to return to its pre-pregnancy alignment and shape. Additionally, as shifted and constrained organs return to their pre-pregnancy locations, the wearer of a Bellefit® garment will feel held in place and more confident in her body movements.

History of Girdles

A girdle is a garment that encircles the lower torso, perhaps extending below the hips, and worn often for support. The word girdle originally meant a belt. In modern English, the term girdle is most commonly used for a form of women’s foundation wear that replaced the corset in popularity. In sports, a girdle may be similar to compression shorts.

Historically and in anthropology, the girdle can be a scanty belt-shaped textile for men and/or women, worn on its own, not holding a larger garment in place, and less revealing than the loin-cloth, as was used by Minoan pugilists.

In fact, using a postpregnancy girdle post-baby is a tradition in many cultures; the Japanese call their girdle wrap a ‘sarashi,’ hispanics call their binder a ‘faja,’ and the Malays call it a bengkung.

Constructed of elasticized fabric and sometimes fastened with hook and eye closures, the modern girdle is designed to enhance a woman’s figure. Most open-bottom girdles extend from the waist to the upper thighs. In the 1960s, these models fell from favor and were to a great extent replaced by the panty girdle. The panty girdle resembles a tight pair of athletic shorts. Both models of girdles usually include suspender clips to hold up stockings.

Girdles were considered essential garments by many women from about 1920 to the late 1960s. They created a rigid, controlled figure that was seen as eminently respectable and modest. They were also crucial to the couturier Christian Dior’s 1947 New Look, which featured a voluminous skirt and a narrow, nipped-in waistline, also known as a wasp waist.

Later in the 1960s, the girdle was generally supplanted by pantyhose. Pantyhose replaced girdles for many women who had used the girdle essentially as a means of holding up sheer nylon stockings. Those who want more control purchase “control top” pantyhose.

Girdles and “body shapers” are still sold to women who want to shape their figure with a garment. Some of these garments incorporate a brassiere and thus become functionally equivalent to a corset. However, they do not incorporate boning and hence do not produce the constricted waistline characteristic of Victorian-era corsets.

Postpartum Girdle Benefits

  • Doctor recommended.
  • Provides support for pendulous abdomen after pregnancy.
  • Helps straighten the spine after nine months carrying the baby.
  • Right compression prevents enlargement of fatty cells.
  • Helps the uterus go back to its place in less time.
  • Easy access to the groin with convenient flap with hooks.
  • Stays in place and offers overall support.
  • Won’t roll down your back or ride up your buttocks.
  • Helps you perform daily duties without feeling the aftermath effects of an overweight belly.
  • Aides emotionally since you want to look nice and fit as soon as possible.
  • Highly necessary on the second or third pregnancy.
  • Great for lymphatic drainage; decreases the risks of fluid collection and helps reduce swelling.
  • Perfect to use after surgery not only for C-Section, but also Hysterectomy, Diastasis-Recti.